Data as far as the eye can see

See below for all the details on our latest release…

The new things:

Climate data gold mine!
We’ve integrated FIVE new climate datasets to complement all the existing data provided by the BCCVL. These new datasets will extend the ability for researchers to perform advanced biodiversity and climate impact modelling.

Climate 2

This work is thanks to the Research Data Services Terrestrial Systems project (collaboration with James Cook University, Griffith University and QCIF) and in particular Dr Collin Storley from James Cook University who prepared all the data for upload into the BCCVL. Thanks to this work, the BCCVL now has the following suite of climate datasets ready to be used in your models:

  • Global datasets
    • CRUCLIM (Past and Current: 5 year intervals from 1915 – 1995, 19 bioclimatic variables)
    • WorldClim (Current and Future: 1950-2000, 2050, 2070, 19 bioclimatic variables)
    • CLIMOND (Current and Future: 1975, 2030, 2050, 2080, 2090 & 2100, 35 bioclimatic variables)
  • Australia-wide datasets
    • AustCLIM (Current and Future: 1976-2005, 10 year intervals 2015 – 2085, 19 bioclimatic variables)
  • Regional Australia datasets
    • NARCLIM (Current and Future: 2000, 2030 & 2070, 25 bioclimatic variables. NSW, VIC and ACT)
    • TASCLIM (Past, Current and Future: 5 year intervals, 1975 – 2085, 19 bioclimatic variables, Tasmania)
    • AccuCLIM (Past and Current: 5 year intervals, 1965 – 2000, 7 bioclimatic variables. Aust Wet Tropics)
We’re working on an information sheet that helps users to decide which climate dataset is most suitable for their needs, so watch this space!

 

The improved things:

  • We launched our new website makeover which includes a public facing data portal, so now you can search, find and visualise all available data without even logging in!
  • Improvements to the number of notification emails you receive when running an experiment. You now only receive two emails per experiment: one on your first result, and one of your last result (particularly helpful when running multispecies distribution models with hundreds of species!)
  • Included citation information for data imported from GBIF
  • We’ve rescaled bioclim variables in WorldClim and the Australian climate datasets so that they are comparable across all other climate datasets

The fixed things:

  • Fixes to display issues for Global PET dataset
  • General bug fixes

Coming soon:

  • SDM Bank. A catalogue of species distribution models and climate change projections for thousands of Australian species.
  • Biodiverse experiment upgrade, including an interactive map query so you can better investigate what is driving your biodiversity hotspots!
  • Conservation planning library of results. That is, we’re compiling a list of popular conservation planning tools (e.g. Zonation, Marxan) and ensuring your model outputs are in a format that is readable for use in these tools.
  • Species Trait Modelling. We’re working alongside Aekos to import their targeted species trait data for use in our upcoming new Species Trait Modelling experiment.

Don’t forget about our workshop programs:

We have developed two different workshop programs aimed at advancing both academic, industry and student knowledge in biodiversity and climate impact modelling. These workshops have been run across a number of different universities and government institutions with great success.

If you would be interested in hosting one of these workshops for your team, or students then please get in contact with Sarah Richmond at support@bccvl.org.au.

Academic and Industry
In the first half of this workshop participants will use the ALA Spatial Portal to learn about key features, data quality issues, environmental layers and simple but powerful tools like scatterplots to get a better understanding of taxa-environment relationships. They will then take what they have learnt in the ALA to the BCCVL to explore the basic elements of species distribution models and climate change projections, including the data required to run the models, the differences across various model algorithms and how to appropriately interpret and evaluate the results of model outputs. Using the BCCVL, workshop participants will access national datasets to run a species distribution model and then project the results into the future using a climate change projection under a number of different emission scenarios. No complex coding/statistical knowledge is required.

Of interest to: students, environmental/climate scientists and researchers, ecologists, decision-makers, members of government and industry groups, and anyone with a keen interest in conservation and climate impacts.

Undergraduate
Students in this workshop will learn the basic elements of species distribution models and climate change projections, including the data required to run the models, the differences across various model algorithms and how to appropriately interpret and evaluate model outputs. Using the BCCVL, students will access national datasets to run a species distribution model and then project the results into the future using a climate change projection under a number of different emission scenarios. Students will then practice their ‘elevator pitch’ by presenting their results and subsequent conservation/management strategies to the class in a 3-slides in 3-minutes style presentation. No complex coding/statistical knowledge is required.

Of interest to: students studying ecology, environmental science, sustainability, climate change impacts, biology, flora and fauna, animal behaviour, planning and development, conservation, statistics etc.

Send us your feedback

The BCCVL is still in active development so be sure to send through your feedback. We are always interested in how we can improve the BCCVL for our users.

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